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The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories – Author Interview – I.A Watson

Throughout the Kickstarter campaign, we will be adding brief interviews highlighting the talented authors who have contributed to the anthology. Today we have the excellent I.A Watson.

How did you first get introduced to Sherlock Holmes?

My name is Watson and I was brainy at school. People were calling me Dr Watson in the playground when I was six years old. I guess I found out about Holmes by osmosis around then.

I was once interviewed on some late-night radio station regarding my Holmes stories – I think I’d just won a Pulp Factory award for Best Pulp Short Story for a Holmes mystery called “The Last Deposit”. The interviewer asked me if I was related to the famous Dr John Watson. I thought he was joking, so I jokingly replied, “Well, the family doesn’t much like to talk about Great Uncle John. Nobody was happy that he joined the army as a military surgeon, and then afterwards he got a lot of vulgar attention from the press. Grandmother would never speak of him.”

But then, as the interview progressed, it became quite clear that this interviewer had completely bought what I said. It slowly dawned. He’d completely bought into ‘the Great Game’. I was joking about how Uncle John’s service revolver was kept in a locked box and how I wondered if more of his old papers were sealed in there too. The interviewer was getting really excited that he might have an exclusive. I really thought he was playing along, or winding me up. But no.

If that interviewer is reading this, let me just say, “I’m sorry.” Uncle John’s secrets should have been kept in the family.

What was the inspiration for your pastiche?

I’ve written a lot of Sherlock Holmes stories now, mostly for Airship 27’s Consulting Detective series, three for MX, most recently a tale for Sherlock Holmes and Dr Was Not from IFWG. My challenge now is to keep things interesting and new while remaining entirely faithful to the canon and style of the original work.

I often start from the idea that Watson and his literary editor Doyle were known to amend the stories before they were published, to offer necessary anonymity and to suppress details that might have shocked the Victorian public. There are some stories for which the world was not ready in 1891. So sometimes I image what cases Watson may have decided to seal up in his desk drawer and not yet reveal. Perhaps it was because they were political, scandalous, potentially libellous, matters of national security or a lady’s reputation. Only now can some stories be told.

Also, the genre of detective fiction, which almost started with Holmes, has now developed quite a bit. We have police procedurals, forensic investigations, and social psychodramas, and a much wider menu of crimes that can be investigated than was considered proper to mention when Watson was thrilling reader of The Strand Magazine. So there are some story-types and cases that we haven’t seen the master detective handle, though there’s no reason he shouldn’t – except that the story-form had not quite coalesced in his day.

Holmes called in to investigate the kidnapping of a child? Holmes facing a seedy druglord? Holmes against the best agent Otto von Bismarck can send against Britain? Holmes against the Fenian bombers? The game is afoot!

What is your story about? Where and when does it take place?

“The Fourpenny Coffin” is a good example of what I mean about story-types. We often see Holmes dealing with cases brought to him by the richest and most powerful members of society. But what about the murder of an itinerant, a homeless tramp who shelters from the bitter London winter by renting a “fourpenny coffin”, a cheap sleeping box in a Salvation Army-type hostel hall – and is murdered there? We get to see Holmes and Watson in a different kind of London, which allows us to have our familiar heroes doing and reacting to different things.

And I got to add in lots of lovely footnotes about Victorian homelessness and Guy Fawkes’ Night.

What do you believe readers will most enjoy most about your tale?

Holmes has a certain way with experts and pompous authority figures who try to thwart him. He is always the smartest person in the room and sometimes he doesn’t bother to hide it, especially when he is confronted with someone he believes should not be such a fool. Watson often has to act as a buffer to protect mere mortals from the Great Detective’s ire. But sometimes Watson gets worked up too, when he sees an injustice, an impoliteness to a woman, a fellow who is a bounder or a blaggard. And then it is Holmes who must rein in his friend.

If you agree with the above statement, that’s probably what you’ll like about the story.

Which is your favourite story from The Canon and why?

This varies depending on the day you ask me, but today it is “The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans”. It has all the elements that one might wish for in a Holmes story – Mycroft, Lestrade, an odd crime in an odder place (the first mystery to involve the London Underground?), a respectable man who is not as respectable as he seems, and a memorable villain in the brutal Oberstein. There’s even a whisper of Queen Victoria herself; well, someone gave Holmes that tie-pin.

Your favourite Sherlock Holmes-related place?

The seven drops of The Reichenbach Falls are moody and impressive, especially at night, after rainfall, at those parts of the year when the water is not regulated by the new hydro-electric dam. It is also the only Holmes-related destination that one can (and indeed should) reach by funicular.

Tell us three things about yourself that few people would guess?

I would prefer that people use their acuity to interpret the obvious signs from my gait, appearance, vocabulary, and habits: a man of sedentary customs, judging by the spread about my middle, and much given to the use of a keyboard cradled sloppily on the lap; of untidy habits, especially in the matter of filing paperwork, whose study is a cluttered profusion of tomes and manuscripts; and with some interest in the outré and ineffable, judging by the list of some seventy-odd books, short stories, and monographs advertised on the website http://www.chillwater.org.uk/writing/iawatsonhome.htm and at the Amazon author page https://www.amazon.co.uk/I-A-Watson/e/B00E47RJFE

Any upcoming projects?

My next Holmes short story, a rather unusual “team-up” between Holmes and Elizabethan royal Thaumaturgist Dr John Dee (no, really) is in the anthology Sherlock Holmes and Dr Was Not, which will be out in shops pretty much anytime now.

After that my anthology Bulldog Drummond: Disaster Zones follows up on my novel Bulldog Drummond: On Poisoned Ground released by Airship 27 earlier this year.

My four Robin Hood books are due to be re-released before Christmas is one massive 828-page anthology, The Legend of Robin Hood, complete with a new story by me so that everyone has to buy the old stuff again just to get the new bit.

And I am now officially behind schedule to start writing Sir Mumphrey Wilton and the Horrors of the Last Page, a WWII Saturday matinee-style romp sequel to Sir Mumphrey Wilton and the Lost City of Mystery, from Chillwater Press.

For MX, I’ve turned in another Solar Pons mystery, “The Adventure of the Drowned Genealogist” and a couple more Sherlock Holmes stories, “The Adventure of the Substitute Detectives” and “The Adventure of the Giant’s Wife”, which will doubtless be unleashed upon the unsuspecting public in due course.

Click here for more details on the Kickstarter campaign.

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The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories – Author Interview – Mark Mower

Throughout the Kickstarter campaign, we will be adding brief interviews highlighting the talented authors who have contributed to the anthology. Today we have the excellent Mark Mower.

How did you first get introduced to Sherlock Holmes?

My passion for tales about Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson began at the age of twelve, when I watched an early black and white film featuring the unrivalled screen pairing of Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce. Hastily seeking out the original stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and continually searching for further post-Canonical stories, this has been a lifelong obsession of mine.

What was the inspiration for your pastiche?

My story features in Part XVI of the anthology and is entitled, ‘The Spectral Pterosaur’. I wanted to relay a story that had a supernatural feel but wasn’t about human ghosts or vampires. As part of a school project, my daughter happened to be researching the life of Mary Anning, the pioneering amateur fossil collector who spent her life discovering ‘curiosities’ like the head of an ichthyosaur and contributed much to the developing science of palaeontology. Fascinated by her work and reading more about nineteenth century dinosaur discoveries, the story emerged quite naturally.

What is your story about? Where and when does it take place?

The tale is set in the 1880s. Holmes and Watson receive an unexpected visit from Inspector Stephen Maddocks of Scotland Yard. The weary detective claims to have seen a terrifying and “unearthly vision” while on guard duty at the British Museum’s Natural History building. When the dutiful inspector then succumbs to an immediate and fatal heart attack, our heroes are prompted to investigate what has given rise to ‘The Spectral Pterosaur’.

What do you believe readers will most enjoy most about your tale?

The story has many period details and is set primarily within what is now London’s Natural History Museum – an atmospheric location for any Victorian tale. As well as explaining the early history of palaeontology, the narrative has a good plot twist and something of a red herring (in this case not fossilised).

Which is your favourite story from The Canon and why?

It has to be ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’ for its brooding, visual portrayal of Dartmoor and epic storyline. In my first non-fiction book, ‘Suffolk Tales of Mystery & Murder’, I wrote a chapter about the regular reports of mysterious big cats being seen in the county. When doing some media interviews for the book launch, I was asked about the possible connection between the legend of ‘Black Shuck’ (an infamous East Anglian Devil Dog that was seen in Suffolk during the sixteenth century) and more contemporary sightings of anomalous big cats. It occurred to me then that Black Shuck has a lot more in common with my favourite fictional hound…

Any upcoming projects?

My third collection of pastiches, ‘Sherlock Holmes: The Baker Street Legacy’, will be published in November 2019 and is already available for pre-order! Beyond that, I’m working on a fourth book with more intriguing tales that are designed to contribute in some small part to the lasting memory of two extraordinary men who once occupied that setting we have come to know and love as 221B Baker Street.

Click here for more details on the Kickstarter campaign.

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The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories – Author Interview – Tim Gambrell

Throughout the Kickstarter campaign, we will be adding brief interviews highlighting the talented authors who have contributed to the anthology. Today we have the excellent Tim Gambrell.

How did you first get introduced to Sherlock Holmes?

At the age of 8, I saw The Hound of the Baskervilles dramatised on BBC TV over four Sundays and fell in love with it. The adaptation starred Tom Baker, who I’d adored as Dr Who and also adored as Holmes. I was disappointed he didn’t get to do any more stories. About 5 years later, at school, I finally read the original novel after pressure from my English teacher, Mrs Barrett, to stop reading Dr Who books, which weren’t sufficiently well written in her view.

What was the inspiration for your pastiche?

I wanted to write a horror story, something macabre and gruesome but not needlessly bloody or excessive.

What is your story about? Where and when does it take place?

It’s about the ghost of a profligate old lady who haunts her creditors. It takes place in London – largely around Whitechapel – in the late 1880s.

What do you believe readers will most enjoy most about your tale?

Hopefully they will enjoy the characters and guessing what is actually going on with the hauntings.

Which is your favourite story from The Canon and why?

The Hound of the Baskervilles. I re-read it annually these days, and still get huge enjoyment from it. The text literally drips with atmosphere, mystery and fin de siecle menace. I think it has everything one could want from a Holmes mystery / adventure story.

Your favourite Sherlock Holmes-related place?

About 20 years ago I used to walk Baker Street daily on my way from Bryanston Square, where I was staying with friends, to High Holborn, where I was working. The street has a real presence. However, I have always  loved Devon (we moved to Exeter in 2015) and the unforgiving landscape of Dartmoor is firmly fixed in my heart.

Tell us three things about yourself that few people would guess?

1: I have a wife, two small boys, 2 small cats and 7 chickens. Only some of these lay eggs.

2: I have all my own hair and teeth. So far.

3: I once received a personal phone call from the actor David Suchet.

4: I can’t count.

Any upcoming projects?

Yes! Thanks for asking. I’ve just recently had my first novel published in the (Dr Who spin-off) Lethbridge-Stewart range from Candy Jar books. It’s also been re-told as a complementary book in their younger readers range, The Lucy Wilson Mysteries, which is due out in August. More details here on the Candy Jar website.http://www.candy-jar.co.uk/books/lucywilson&thebledoecadets.html

Click here for more details on the Kickstarter campaign.

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The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories – Author Interview – Roger Riccard

Throughout the Kickstarter campaign, we will be adding brief interviews highlighting the talented authors who have contributed to the anthology. Today we have the excellent Roger Riccard.

How did you first get introduced to Sherlock Holmes?

First introduced to Sherlock Holmes via the Book of the Month Club as a teenager in the late ‘60’s.

What was the inspiration for your pastiche?

After watching the outstanding Sherlock Holmes Granada TV series with Jeremy Brettt and Edward Hardwicke, I felt I now had a real handle on the characters, especially since Watson was no longer portrayed as the buffoon of the Nigel Bruce era.

Having completed two novels, I was looking for inspiration and decided to use a short story I had written for the Sherlockian E-Times and build upon it, thus creating Sherlock Holmes Adventures for the 12 Days of Christmas. This collection of twelve short stories inspired my current project;

A Sherlock Holmes Alphabet of Cases. Volume Three (K-O) is due out this Fall. This has tales ranging from 1881 to 1900 and involves international intrigue (The Kaiser Role and The Origami Mystery); secret messages (The Trinity Leprechaun and the Origami Mystery); the original ‘domestic complication’ of Mrs. Cecil Forrester (The Monique Mystery) and a visiting American with a mystery of his own (The Notable Musician).

What do you believe readers will most enjoy most about your tale?

My goal in all the stories is to have the reader see things through Watson’s eyes and to build upon the Watson-Holmes relationship. As smart as Holmes is, he needs Watson’s temperament and ability to be ‘a conductor of light” to help him function socially within a society that is far below his intellectual capacity.

Which is your favourite story from The Canon and why?

My favorite canonical story is the Adventure of the Abbey Grange. In addition to brilliant deductions, Holmes sympathizes with the real culprit and walks that fine line wherein he gives Inspector Hopkins the necessary clues, but refuses to solve the case for him, He shows compassion for the wronged woman and her saviour and gives Watson the highest of compliments when he appoints him as the representative of a British jury.

Your favourite Sherlock Holmes-related place?

My favorite Holmes-related place is 221B Baker Street. It is there where most adventures begin and often end. It is where we see the best interactions between Holmes and Watson, as well as Mrs. Hudson in her mother-hen role. The indexes, the chemical table, the Persian slipper, the jackknife pinned to the correspondence and the ever-present pipe, filling the room with a blue haze as the detective runs his observations and deductions through his mind, these are the things that help define Holmes.

Tell us three things about yourself that few people would guess?

As to myself and things people may not guess: I am a baseball aficionado, having played in college and trying out for the California Angels. I also enjoy old movies from the 30’s and 40’s, mostly comedies with Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, and Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, in addition to John Wayne westerns. I also am a big fan of both movie and Broadway musicals brought to film in the Golden Age of the 50’s and 60’s. Finally, my wife, Rosilyn, led me into singing with a group that entertains seniors in retirement homes. Often with tunes from those same Broadway shows.

Any upcoming projects?

As far as upcoming projects: A Sherlock Holmes Alphabet of Cases. Volume Three (K-O) is due out this Fall. Volume Four of the Alphabet of Cases is due out in 2020 and the finale, Volume Five, the year after that. I also have what I hope will be a unique volume written from Holmes perspective in my long-range plans.

One book I’m especially proud to plug, in addition to my current work, is the E-reader version of Sherlock Holmes Twelve Days of Christmas, as it contains the whole set, rather than the paperback version which came out in two volumes. (Personal note: My favorite story is The Three French Henchmen)

Click here for more details on the Kickstarter campaign.

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The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories – Author Interview – David Marcum

Throughout the Kickstarter campaign, we will be adding brief interviews highlighting the talented authors who have contributed to the anthology. Today we have the excellent David Marcum. David is the creator and editor of the MX anthology series.

David lives in eastern Tennessee with his wife and son. He’s a licensed civil engineer, and has been reading, collecting, and chronologicizing traditional Sherlock Holmes pastiches since he was ten years old in 1975. Since then, he’s collected literally thousands of pastiches – and that’s nowhere enough!

David’s irregular blog, “A Seventeen Step Program”, can be found at:

http://17stepprogram.blogspot.com/

His books are available at:

https://www.amazon.com/David-Marcum/e/B00K1IKA92/

How did you first get introduced to Sherlock Holmes?

In 1975, when I was ten years old, I received a Holmes books as an “extra” when I was trading with a friend for some Hardy Boys books. I didn’t much want it, but a few weeks later, I saw part of a Holmes movie on television, remembered the book, found it and read it, and have been a Sherlockian ever since.

What was the inspiration for your pastiches in this current collection, “The Regressive Man”, “The Reappearance of Mr. James Phillimore”, and “The Unnerved Estate Agent”?

This time I wrote three pastiches, one for each of the three books in this current set. I usually don’t have a plan when I start writing. Rather, I just let Watson whisper to me. “The Regressive Man” is a straightforward mystery, but as the story was being told, I realized that one of the characters might have something in common with a famous figure from British lore and history – and might even be that person. “The Reappearance of Mr. James Phillimore” begins with a woman relating to Holmes how each night a terrifying intrusion occurs in her house. Holmes recognizes the address as the same one where James Phillimore disappeared several years before. For “The Unnerved Estate Agent”, the client tells Holmes his story about a mysterious house in the middle of nowhere that he recognizes from a recurring dream that he’s had all his life. Coincidentally, it’s the same recurring dream that I’ve had over the years too, although the client’s reasons are much different than mine.

What do you believe readers will most enjoy most about your tales?  

I hope that the readers will enjoy them for being very sincere attempts to relate traditional Canonical Holmes stories – which is the only kind that I write, read, care about, or promote.

Which is your favourite story from The Canon and why?

I really can’t pick. I re-read The Canon a lot, along with hundreds of traditional Holmes pastiches, and to me it’s all part of one gigantic picture, The Great Holmes Tapestry. As such, the pitifully few 60 stories from The Canon all fill important anchor points amongst all the other stories, many of which are as good or better than the originals, and I appreciate each of them for what they show and provide.

What is your favourite Holmes-related place?

I’ve been able to travel to England for three different Holmes Pilgrimages. If it wasn’t about Holmes, I pretty much didn’t do it. Of all the Holmes-related places that I visited, the one I most wanted to see was The Sherlock Holmes Museum in Baker Street. While some things about the museum are incorrect, there is a lot that’s perfect, and being in a correctly laid-out house in Baker Street gives a whole new and unforgettable perspective to reading and writing and editing Holmes stories. I’ve now been to the museum seven times, and I hope to go many more times in the future.

Tell us three things about yourself that few people would guess?

1)      I began playing the piano at age eight, and during my first two years of college (when I was obtaining my first degree), I was a piano performance major with a piano scholarship, before switching majors my junior year to business management and ending up with a music minor. (I still play, but I enjoy my amateur status.)

2)      I actually read and collect a lot of other books besides just stories about Sherlock Holmes – despite how it may seem. I have thousands of Holmes books in my collection, mostly traditional pastiches, but I have even more than that about other heroes, and I’m often reading multiple books at the same time.

3)      Although I’ve mentioned it elsewhere, I was a U.S. Federal Investigator throughout my twenties, before the agency was eliminated, causing me to return to school for a second degree in Civil Engineering. I had a number of pretty interesting cases, and even now I can’t talk about some of them.

Any upcoming projects?

I’m currently editing a number of forthcoming Holmes anthologies for both MX Publishing and Belanger Books. Additionally, work continues on the reissues of the Dr. Thorndyke novels, and I recently completed my 51st pastiche, closing in on the magic number of “60”, the number of Holmes adventures in the original Canon.

Click here for more details on the Kickstarter campaign.

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The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories – Author Interview – S. Subramanian

Throughout the Kickstarter campaign, we will be adding brief interviews highlighting the talented authors who have contributed to the anthology. Today we have the excellent S. Subramanian.

How did you first get introduced to Sherlock Holmes?

Through a Classics Illustrated version of The Sign of Four at age 9. That was enough to set me off on the originals at age 10. I had the great good fortune of reading the short story collections in their chronological order: The AdventuresThe MemoirsThe ReturnHis Last Bow, and The Case-Book.

What was the inspiration for your pastiche?

In two words: David Marcum.

What is your story about? Where and when does it take place?

The story is about the perceived vampyric persecution of the tobacco millionaire John Vincent Harden, and deals with the question of whether the persecution is delusional or ‘real’. The tale is set in London, where, as the great Vincent Starrett put it, ‘it is always eighteen ninety-five.’

What do you believe readers will most enjoy most about your tale?

I’ll be grateful if they enjoy any part of it! In particular, I hope they’ll appreciate my bringing together Sherlock Holmes and Father Brown, and that their voices will be found to be recognizably authentic.

Which is your favourite story from The Canon and why?

Two favourites, if I may be allowed the luxury! ‘The Speckled Band’ (what atmospherics!) and ‘The Sussex Vampire’ (one of Doyle’s particularly human stories).

Your favourite Sherlock Holmes-related place?

Meiringen!

Tell us three things about yourself that few people would guess?

I’m red-headed, I wear golden pince-nez, and I have a swamp adder for a pet. No, just kidding! Seriously, though: (1) I am a retired professor of Economics; (2) I live within three hours by bus from Pondicherry (yes, as in ‘Pondicherry Lodge’!), in the city of Chennai (formerly Madras); and (3) believe me or not, I’ve never had a jezail bullet lodged in any of my limbs.

Any upcoming projects?

Some ‘Bulldog’ Drummond spoofs, if anybody will read them!

Click here for more details on the Kickstarter campaign.

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The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories – Author Interview – Kevin P. Thornton

Throughout the Kickstarter campaign, we will be adding brief interviews highlighting the talented authors who have contributed to the anthology. Today we have the excellent Kevin P. Thornton.

Kevin is on Twitter and Facebook – and his short stories have found their home in the world of Sherlock Holmes. As well as being in MX Volumes IX, XI, XIII the upcoming XV, and more to come, he has had stories in other anthologies featured here. A seven time finalist in the Crime Writers of Canada Arthur Ellis Awards, he will next be in the Mesdames of Mayhem collection due in the fall.  In the key of 13 launches in Toronto on Saturday, October 26, Sleuth of Baker Street.

How did you first get introduced to Sherlock Holmes?

I started out as a child, the youngest  of a long line of readers. The family had the Reader’s Digest condensed Sherlock Holmes which I gobbled up as a precocious 6 year old before getting into the Canon 2 years later.

What was the inspiration for your pastiche?

Catholicism, trying to make sense of nonsensical beliefs, and the unnatural world’s ability to unsettle Holmes on occasion.

What is your story about? Where and when does it take place?

It is a manor mystery, typical of so much of the Canon. Something strange is happening at the Marquess of Mollington’s country estate, and Holmes and Watson ride to the rescue, as is their wont.

What do you believe readers will most enjoy most about your tale?

I like to see SH as occasionally imperfect, and quite often I explore those little imperfections that make him seem more human. This is one of those cases.

Which is your favourite story from The Canon and why?

His Last Bow, because as a writer it gives me so much more to hope for.  What did he actually do in retirement; there must have been more to it than bees. Others have explored the senior Holmes with much success, as have I. In Belanger Books’ upcoming collection Sherlock Holmes and the Great Detectives, I have a look at Holmes as a man over ninety years old, and his latter-years friendship with Father Brown, while in It Came From The North I investigate the intersection of Tesla, SH and time travel in WW II.

Your favourite Sherlock Holmes-related place?

The Toronto public library collection. It is so un-museumlike. You can sit in a replica of his rooms, take books down and page through them, make notes, take photos of books you want for your own collection. I go there every time I am in the city.

Tell us three things about yourself that few people would guess?

1) I live in Northern Canada, Fort McMurray. When the entire community was evacuated due to wildfires in 2016, I ended up writing about it for the New York Times.
2) The year I was a finalist in the short story category of the Arthur Ellis Awards, Margaret Atwood also entered. I didn’t win.

3) I used to work in Afghanistan as a contractor for the NATO Task Force.

Any upcoming projects?

There are more Marcum and Belanger related works down the line as well as the aforementioned Mesdames of Mayhem collection. I’m also working on a short story or novella about one of the least written about characters from the Canon. More on that to come.

Click here for more details on the Kickstarter campaign.

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The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories – Author Interview – Kelvin Jones

Throughout the Kickstarter campaign, we will be adding brief interviews highlighting the talented authors who have contributed to the anthology. Today we have the excellent Kelvin Jones.

How did you first get introduced to Sherlock Holmes?

Through my public library in London.

‘I am an omnivorous reader.’ – Holmes

What was the inspiration for your pastiche?

The true story of Edmund Kelly and Dr John Dee, both Elizabethan necromancers.

What is your story about? Where and when does it take place?

The story concerns the discovery of an ancient box, which the owner of a large Elizabethan house, discovers. This is tale from the early years of Holmes, as told by him to Dr Watson.

What do you believe readers will most enjoy most about your tale?

The gothic and almost supernatural and sinister atmosphere.

Which is your favourite story from The Canon and why?

Undoubtedly the Hound of The Baskervilles. As Doyle commented to his mother ‘It’s a real creeper!’

Your favourite Sherlock Holmes-related place?

The Cedars in Lee, now London, where Jean Leckie, Doyle’s 2nd wife, lived, as did Neville S Clair, the central character in The Man  with the Twisted Lip and which was also  the birthplace of my favourite Victorian poet, Ernest Dowson.

Tell us three things about yourself that few people would guess?

I have  edited a six volume edition of the shocking erotic memoirs of a Victorian gentleman, under the title of ‘Satryiasis.’ I have recently reissued a 2 volume, annotated edition of Krafft Ebing’s ‘Psychopathia Sexualis.’ which, as a study of deviant human sexuality, I am convinced Holmes as a criminologist, would have read.

Any upcoming projects?

A biography and new edition of the work of Ernest Dowson, 19th C. lyrical poet and decadent. I hope to persuade the London Borough where he lived to raise a plaque on the house where he died in 1900 and thus help promote his outstanding work..

Click here for more details on the Kickstarter campaign.

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Author Interview

Today’s featured Sherlock Holmes writer is Paul Hiscock –  his story, ‘The Cassandra of Providence Place’, is in vol. XVIII – now on Kickstarter

The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories XVI to XVIII

What is your story about? Where does it take place?

‘The Cassandra of Providence Place’ is about a young girl who can see the future. She turns to Sherlock Holmes hoping that he can prevent a tragedy that she has predicted. It is set in one of the London slums where she lives.

What was the inspiration for your pastiche?

I came across a photo of the residents of Providence Place The sense of community in that picture just leapt out at me and it seemed like the perfect setting for a story.

Which is your favourite story from The Canon and why?

Most of my favourites are in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and one that stands out is ‘The Red-Headed League’ as it is such an elaborate piece of misdirection. However, I find that I change my mind about my favourite quite frequently.

Your favourite Sherlock Holmes-related place?

For me, Sherlock Holmes belongs on the streets of London. He feels like such an intrinsic part of the city that I almost expect to see him and Watson rushing to their next case whenever I am walking through town.
Paul’s links are:

Website: Detectives and Dragons

Facebook     Twitter       Amazon

Paul also appears in Sherlock Holmes: Adventures in the Realms of Steampunk Volume 2 – Mechanical Men and Otherworldly Endeavours from Belanger Books, which includes his story, ’The Deductive Man’.

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The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories – Author Interview – Robert Stapleton

Throughout the Kickstarter campaign, we will be adding brief interviews highlighting the talented authors who have contributed to the anthology. Today we have the excellent Robert Stapleton.

How did you first get introduced to Sherlock Holmes?

I don’t remember when I first became fascinated with Sherlock Holmes, but it must have been nearly sixty years ago now.  I do know that it was in 1966 when I visited London wearing a deerstalker and smoking a pipe.

What was the inspiration for your pastiche?

My pastiche was inspired by a book I own which records travels in the Caribbean during the early years of the 20th century. I was so intrigued by the book that I imagined a Sherlock Holmes adventure taking place there.

What is your story about? Where and when does it take place?

In the story, You Only Live Thrice, set in early 1901, Inspector Baynes of the Surrey Police is sent to Barbados in order to arrest a fugitive who has swindled a large number of people, including members of the London underworld. On Barbados, Baynes encounters a voodoo priestess, who helps the fugitive to fake his own death on two occasions, until he finally vanishes from a the ship returning him to England. It takes the unexpected arrival of Sherlock Holmes to make sense of what is going on.

What do you believe readers will most enjoy most about your tale?

I hope people will enjoy reading my description of a tropical island, and, assuming I’ve got it right, a brief but hopefully unbiassed examination of voodoo.

Your favourite Sherlock Holmes-related place?

My favourite place connected with Sherlock Holmes is Winchester.

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MX XVIII front cover large

 

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