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Peter E. Blau reviews Watson is not an Idiot by Eddy Webb

“Eddy Webb’s WATSON IS NOT AN IDIOT (2013; 201 pp.) is not a rehabilitation of Watson (who doesn’t really need one any more), but rather (as it’s subtitled) “an opinionated tour of the Sherlock Holmes canon” that offers insights into the stories.”

Watson Is Not An Idiot is available from all good bookstores including  Amazon USAAmazon UKWaterstones UK, and for free shipping worldwide Book Depository . In ebook format it is in Amazon Kindle,  KoboNook and Apple iBooks (iPad/iPhone).

watson is not an idiot

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Peter E. Blau reviews Is That My Holmes? and Is That My Watson? by Andrew Murray

“IS THAT MY HOLMES? and IS THAT MY WATSON? are amusing rhymed picture books written by Andrew Murray, with artwork by Deakin Brook (2013; 24 pp.), that are inspired by recent film and television versions of Holmes and Watson.”

Is That My Holmes? is available from all good bookstores including   Amazon USAAmazon UKWaterstones UK, and for free shipping worldwide Book Depository. In ebook format it is in Amazon Kindle,  KoboNook and Apple iBooks (iPad/iPhone).

Is That My Watson? is available from all good bookstores including   Amazon USAAmazon UKWaterstones UK, and for free shipping worldwide Book Depository. In ebook format it is in Amazon Kindle,  Kobo and Nook.

is that my holmes and watson

 

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Top 10 MX Sherlock Holmes books on Nook – 18th January

Watson’s Afghan Adventure by Kieran McMullen at the top of the top 10 MX Publishing Sherlock Holmes books on Nook Books today.

#407,370  Watson’s Afghan Adventure

#557,937  The Case of the Grave Accusation A Sherlock Holmes Adventure

#568,206  Baker Street Beat

#588,073  A Case of Witchcraft

#655,280  Barefoot on Baker Street

#736,252  Bertram Fletcher Robinson – a Footnote to the Hound of Baskervilles

#742,817  Lost Stories of Sherlock Holmes

#1,042,261  Murder In The Library

#1,067,008  Shadowfall a novel of Sherlock Holmes

#1,137,739  In Search of Dr Watson

For a full listing of Nook Holmes books check out the Sherlock Holmes Nook Books page on Pinterest.

watsons afghan

 

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Sherlock Holmes Society of London reviews The Many Watsons

“In The Many Watsons Kieran McMullen takes a look at fifty-four actors, male and female, who have played Dr Watson or a Watson character on screen. It’s good to see the Watsons getting their share of attention, though the text needs proofreading, and I could wish that the actors had been dealt with in alphabetical or chronological order. Should there be a second edition, I hope Mr McMullen will include some at least of the radio Watsons – Leigh Lovell, Alfred Shirley, Norman Shelley, Michael Williams, Andrew Sachs, Larry Albert… Royalties from this light, lively collection of essays will go to the Undershaw Preservation Trust.”

Roger Johnson

The Many Watsons is available from all good bookshops including in the USA Amazon andBarnes and Noble, in the UK Amazon and Waterstones. For elsewhere Book Depositorywho offer free delivery worldwide. In ebook format there is KindleiPadNook and Kobo.

 

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Review of ‘In Search of Dr Watson’ from Molly Carr by An Ill-dressed Vagabond

An Ill-dressed Vagabond is one of the most respected Sherlock Holmes reviewers in the USA. Here is his review of Molly Carr’s fascinating biography of Dr.Watson from May 2011.

“This book is a study of the sources and uses of John H. Watson as presented in the sixty Sherlockian tales written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

The author examines the relationship between the characters of Holmes and Watson in a careful fashion to determine why Doyle chose to create Watson as both a foil and a counterpoint for Holmes and how that choice affected the style and development of the stories over the forty years in which they were written. In addition, similar characters in Literature are discussed and analyzed to provide examples of alternative methods and the problems involved in using such figures.

While this seems to be a simple task, it is really anything but simple. The unique nature of Sherlock Holmes as an Archetype of Literature, ‘The Great Detective,’ is actually dependent on the methods Doyle used to present him. These methods all come down to using Watson as narrator, question asker, foil and stalking horse. The two personas of Holmes and Watson together allow the author to select the data to be presented to the readers in a very careful fashion. Holmes can maintain his own counsel without revealing answers before the author is ready. In addition, space and time can be devoted to various items of byplay between the two that constitute ‘filler’ for the stories that would otherwise be rather dry and dull.

In addition to a discussion of the methods Doyle used in writing and the uses he made of Watson, the author needs to discuss the many controversial features of the Sherlockian tales. These include time and dating problems, names of both persons and places, and identification of real events and persons, either included in or excluded from the tales. Most of these discussion items are familiar to Sherlockians, but are presented here in a comprehensive fashion with analyses of several different approaches and aspects. Total agreement is not really possible, but the author works to untangle the mare’s nest and to explain many of the sources of the problems.

Finally, the inspiration for names and places mentioned is examined and several ideas are offered that may help readers to understand what might have been in Doyle’s mind at various times. Several surprising triggers are identified and others proposed as real world inspirations for places, persons and events that showed up in the tales.

This is an interesting and well-written summary of the data available about John H. Watson. It covers a lot of territory and does so in a readable and interesting fashion. Experienced Sherlockians will recognize many points of discussion and readers new to ‘The Grand Game’ will find a strong introduction to Sherlockian ‘higher criticism.’”

In Search of Dr Watson is available from all good bookstores and in all formats worldwide including Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Amazon Kindle, Kobo Books and iBooks (iPad/iPhone).

 

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The Deerstalkers of Welshpool review ‘A Study In Crimson’ – the further adventures of Mrs.Watson (Sherlock Holmes)

A Study In Crimson

A Study In Crimson

A Study in Crimson is the second adventure of Mrs. Watson and Emily Fanshaw. Already dubbed ‘The Female Sherlock Holmes’ Molly Carr’s character is proving very popular with Holmes fans. Here is the review from the leading Sherlockian Group in Wales – The Deerstalkers of Welshpool.

“Molly Carr has produced another book about her two female detectives, mutated from minor characters in the Holmes stories. I think it helps if you have read the first book [The Sign of Fear], as that explains the strange hypothesis that Watson was a fake.

The book is more a series of short adventures than a novel. These show imagination, and a wicked sense of humour. Most of the results of the investigations are accidental, rather than being due to the skill of the offbeat female detectives.

The locations range from New York to Baden Baden and Geneva, in addition to London and Scotland, and are nicely drawn. As before, Molly uses characters from the Sherlock Holmes – and other – detective stories to people the adventures.”

A Study In Crimson is available from all good bookstores worldwide including Amazon USA, Amazon UK, and in a variety of formats including Kindle, Kobo and iBooks for the iPad.

 

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Book Review – The Sign of Fear – Sherlock Holmes Society of London

‘The Sign of Fear’ is the first in a series of Holmes pastiche novels from Molly Carr, a life long Dr. Watson expert. It features Mrs. Watson as a strong female lead character andthe book has gained very posititive reviews from Holme societies around the world. Here, Roger Johnson from the Sherlock Holmes Society of London reviews the book for their newsletter;

 

“Never mind what you’ve been told: the former Mary Morstan is a woman with a past — so perhaps it’s natural that she should come within the orbit of the Napoleon of Crime. At least we can understand that she should occupy the time during Dr Watson’s long absences by doing detective work herself. More surprising is the identity of her partner, a dangerous young woman to whom male costume is nothing new: “Emily Fanshaw” is actually Mrs Neville St Clair, and she still resents the fact that Sherlock Holmes cut short her husband’s profitable scam by exposing him as the beggar with the twisted lip…

There are more surprises in Mary Watson’s memoirs, not least the revelation that John H Watson, who never qualified as a doctor, was born Ormond Sacker and changed his name by deed poll! Other dubious characters encountered by the intrepid duo include A J Raffles, Bunny Manders, John Clay, Mrs Marple (mother of Jane), and M. Poirot (father of Hercule). Rather like M J Trow’s stories of Inspector Lestrade, the book takes a distinctly revisionist approach to the Canon. The Sign of Fear is something of a guilty pleasure, perhaps, but a pleasure it certainly is!”

Roger Johnson, Sherlock Holmes Society of London

 

The Sign of Fear is available from all good bookstores including Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble USAAmazon UK, Amazon Kindle USA, Book Depository (free delivery to Canada and India), and for the iPad and iPhone through iTunes iBooks.

The sequel to The Sign of Fear, ‘A Study In Crimson‘ was release in November 2010.

 

 
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Posted by on December 31, 2010 in Book Reviews

 

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