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New review of Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter

“Absolutely charming old world style.
This book reaches back to the classical Sherlock Holmes story telling but without the unconnectable instances and characters that sometimes enter the pages of the old ones. I feel that this author has successfully taken the much loved story of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson and made it enjoyable for new generations.
Being based on fact, this mystery will be a delight for historical fiction fans as well as those that enjoy historical and mystery genres. I don’t normally find this genre to my taste, but enjoyed this story a lot and appreciated the author’s respect for his readers.
Sherlock Holmes is a much loved character and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is believed to be in a list of literary greats;I feel that Mr. Symonds has done a marvelous job of staying true to Sir Doyle and the characters that so many people enjoy.”

Reviewed by Shamira

Sherlock Holmes and The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter is available from all good bookstores including   Amazon USAAmazon UKWaterstones UK, and for free shipping worldwide Book Depository . In ebook format it is in Amazon Kindle,  KoboNook and Apple iBooks (iPad/iPhone).

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Review of Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter

„The name Albert Einstein is known the world over, much like Sherlock Holmes. It is therefore unusual that a pastiche featuring the world’s greatest detective and the world’s foremost scientist has never come to light – that is until now. Tim Symonds’ latest Sherlock Holmes novel, The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter at last features these two legendary figures together.

Dr. Watson is given an offer he cannot refuse – to photograph Sherlock Holmes standing on the precipice of the Reichenbach Falls, the site of his struggle with Professor Moriarty. As Watson cajoles Holmes into the trip, they must face the wrath of a vengeful Colonel Sebastian Moran, Moriarty’s former right-hand man. Though the two manage to elude Moran and his gun-toting henchmen, the plot is about to thicken. Holmes and Watson are approached by the Dean of a prestigious Swiss university to investigate a promising young scientist named Albert Einstein. Two letters have been intercepted which Einstein wrote, one referring to a mysterious person named Lieserl. Who could this person be and what connection do they have to Einstein’s life. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson shall journey throughout Europe in their quest for the truth, and will plunge into a world far darker and far more complex than either could ever contemplate.

I must heartily congratulate author Tim Symonds on his writing. The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter is his third Sherlock Holmes pastiche, the other two I have yet to read, but if they are like this one, they should make for some interesting reading. Symonds’ research into his subjects was terrific, weaving in Sherlockian and historical knowledge into the plot. Reading The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter was not only presenting a fine mystery, but a learning experience,and a fine showcase into the situation of turn-of-the-century Europe. Symonds’ prose must also be mentioned as he managed to capture the tone of Doyle’s writing very well, though perhaps incorporated a few too many (for the lack of better words) big words.

In terms of canon, the book fared quite well – the presentation of Dr. Watson should be specially noted. Sherlock Holmes was presented as the intellectual great of Doyle’s originals, but in my mind he did not do enough actual detective work to truly astound me. Other canon figures turned up as well, most notably Colonel Moran, who even after his only canonical appearance is still out to claim the life of the great detective. Another canon villain, whose name I shall not divulge, makes a far too brief cameo and his inclusion, though a nice nod the short stories, did not serve much of a purpose.

The plot of Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter was complex enough and surprisingly dark, but lacked in the dramatic department. With a title like The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter any revelations about a mysterious, unidentified person, aren’t truly revelations. The fact that some historical details are presented in the author’s forward also dispel some of that all-importantmystery, so in essence the solution was presented even before Holmes and Watson embarked on their case!

That is not to say Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter was a disappointing read. With its complex plot and excellent research, the novel made for an interesting historical mystery. The presentation of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson was well-done, some of the best in recent memory. I therefore give The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter 3.5 out of 5 possible stars.”

Reviewed by Nick Cardillo

Sherlock Holmes and The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter is available from all good bookstores including   Amazon USAAmazon UKWaterstones UK, and for free shipping worldwide Book Depository . In ebook format it is in Amazon Kindle,  KoboNook and Apple iBooks (iPad/iPhone).

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Review of Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter

“Synopsis: The Dean of a Swiss university persuades Sherlock Holmes to investigate the background of a would-be lecturer. To Dr. Watson it seems a very humdrum commission – but who is the mysterious ‘Lieserl’? How does her existence threaten the ambitions of the technical assistant level III in Room 86 at the Federal Patents Office in Berne by the name of Albert Einstein? The assignment plunges Holmes and Watson into unfathomable Serbia to solve one of the intractable mysteries of the 20th Century. In Tim Symonds’ previous detective novels, Sherlock Holmes and the Dead Boer At Scotney Castle and Sherlock Holmes And The Case Of The Bulgarian Codex the author based pivotal historic facts and a principal character on real life. So too in this new mystery.

Critique: Once again author Tim Symonds does full and complete justice to the literary legacy that is Sherlock Holmes. Highly recommended for mystery fans in general, and Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts in particular, it should be noted that “Sherlock Holmes and The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter” is also available in a Kindle edition.”

Reviewed by Small Press Bookwatch, Midwest Book Review, James A. Cox, Editor-in-Chief, March 2014

Sherlock Holmes and The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter is available from all good bookstores including   Amazon USAAmazon UKWaterstones UK, and for free shipping worldwide Book Depository . In ebook format it is in Amazon Kindle,  KoboNook and Apple iBooks (iPad/iPhone).

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Review of Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter

“There is a lot of interest in Sherlock Holmes currently, with the BBC’s television series Sherlock and the American CBS series Elementary drawing a new generation of television viewers into the classic characters of Holmes and Dr. Watson. I have seen a few episodes of both shows and while as entertaining as most any contemporary crime drama, both are set in the current-day and their characters, for those of us who have read the canonical Sir Arthur Conan Doyle detective stories, do little but carry on the names of the Conan Doyle heroes—especially in the American series where so many aspects of the original premise have been radically changed. Thus, when I had a novel sent to me for review for In Serbia that announced itself as a Sherlock Holmes mystery, I did roll my eyes a bit. My first thought actually was “can’t people leave the poor Sherlock and good Dr. Watson to rest already and create their own detectives for television and new books?”.

However, my initial concerns were without warrant: unlike these new television shows that rewrite Holmes as a contemporary crime fighter, the novel Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter is set in the early twentieth century and places the central characters much closer to the original circumstances that Conan Doyle devised for them in his own work. For me, even as a boy, much of the joy of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries was in the very fact that they were written in another time and set in that time: there was a grand sense of romance, integrity, and courage found in those books in good part because they represented what many consider to have been the apex of the British Empire. Conan Doyle’s characters have doubtlessly inspired many writers who have worked aspects of those characters into new concepts—the character of Dana Scully on the X-Files has been said to have been inspired by Watson, in example, as Scully is also a medical doctor and is skeptical of many of the ideas of her partner, Agent Fox Mulder. That is fine, to see other writers and film-makers thus inspired, but to remove the duo of Holmes and Watson from their original context is to me rather disturbing and also removes much of their real appeal as characters. Thankfully, the author of this novel, Tim Symonds, places his Holmes and Watson in a context that I could fully see Conan Doyle approving of and one that draws the reader into an exciting mystery.

What makes the Symonds’ book work is the author’s keen sense of timing and his expansive knowledge of history and period traditions and culture. What makes it both all the more exciting and of especial interest to readers of In Serbia is that it is in good part set in Serbia and follows an intriguing path of clues to Novi Sad. Symonds’ command of historical detail cannot be overstated: The man has been able to gather a wealth of compelling details about everything from restaurants of the period to the spectre of scarlet fever and weaves all of this into the narrative. While the novel is of course fiction, the supporting details when sourced from history are fully accurate and the reader will learn many fascinating things about England, Serbia, and the general state of life at the time just by reading this very engrossing mystery. This factor, for me as a journalist who has written about history and was educated at university in history, is quite spectacular. Very few writers of fiction attend to historical detail with such care. Symonds also is quite careful and attentive to remain faithful to Conan Doyle’s outlook and the traits he provided his key characters. Several of the canonical Conan Doyle Holmes mysteries are even referenced in the book itself and many of the aspects of language and circumstances found in this novel will be familiar to people who have read the original Conan Doyle stories. Symonds also researched Serbia quite well and is adept in bringing to life the pre-war Serbian countryside and aspects of folklore such as the rusalki—the ghostly female water nymphs—are incorporated into the narrative as unique, engaging, plot devices. Symonds’ knowledge of German academia in the early twentieth century also displays either a longstanding association with the same or else research at the very highest level of historiography. Through and through, no stone has been left unturned by the author in his quest to make every detail of the “real world” in this novel—the actual history that bookends it—as authentic and informed as possible. The fruit of this labor is a novel that shimmers with the sheer amount of learning and care for the powerful detail furnished it by its author.

As to the plot, the combination of Sherlock Holmes and Einstein at first struck me as a bit reaching, but it really works. Einstein obviously was one of the greatest thinkers and greatest men of the entire century and Holmes has been by tradition written a character on rare par in intellect with the great physicist. Einstein and the characters around him thereby provide the author with a great content of human psychology with which to build a mystery and Serbia is well-rendered in prose here, creating a setting that will seem exotic and compelling to those readers not familiar with it but just as enchanting to those of us who know and love Serbia well. Lieserl, Einstein’s daughter of the book’s title, provides a focus of mystery fitting for the world’s greatest detective: The basis in history for this mystery only makes it seem more vivid, more vital for Holmes to solve and more tangible to the reader. Symonds’ writing is in general fascinating and well-crafted though at points his narrative approach is a bit more old-fashioned than today’s mystery writers such as P.D. James—which is fine, given the historical setting and characters of this book. Indeed, I suspect if written with the terse flow of a modern detective novel this book could fail, but Symonds is perfectly able to capture the spirit and sense of Conan Doyle’s writing and build his own novel in a manner that makes it read nearly as if it came from Conan Doyle’s very own pen.

Any complaints? Well, perhaps the book could have been longer, and that isn’t just to say it was so good I didn’t want it to end, though it was in fact that good. It could have, despite its ample detail, in places benefited from additional explanation. Clearly the author had a wealth of research to draw from, and some scenes could have been fleshed out a bit more. Some of this is in nature also the personal views of what I think as a reader (as opposed to as a critic) a novel ideally ought to be, and as the book stands, it is clearly not lacking in the least. Indeed, for its incorporation of actual history and pithy detail I would even say it’s the finest historical mystery novel I’ve read since reading Peter Ackroyd’s seminal Hawksmoor, which is itself easily one of the greatest works of British literature of the 1980s. Tim Symonds’ take on Sherlock Holmes is a fine one, and one of very few worthy of Conan Doyle’s characters found in contemporary post-canonical writing concerning Holmes and Watson. Highly recommended.”

This review was published on the In Serbia website by Mike Walker.

Sherlock Holmes and The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter is available from all good bookstores including   Amazon USAAmazon UKWaterstones UKWatson’s Lounge and for free shipping worldwide Book Depository . In ebook format it is in Kobo,  Apple iBooks(iPad/iPhone).

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Leading Scientist review’s Sherlock Holmes and The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter.

American scientist Frederic Golden wrote the famous article on Einstein for Time Magazine’s ‘Man of the Century’ edition, at the end of 1999. Who better then to review the new Sherlock Holmes novel that covers the controversial subject of his daughter.
“Thank you so much for sharing your latest Sherlock caper with me. A wonderful, page-flipping read. You’ve caught the Conan Doyle ambience and cadences beautifully. How did you ever manage to have Holmes and Watson riding in a tarantass –  a priceless touch? At times, I was sure I was back again in the old master of Baker Street’s literary hands. I don’t agree with your assessment of Mileva’s contribution to relativity – methinks it was slight. And, of course, there is no evidence of the dastardly deed (if in fact there was one). But a homicide, even if justified, is a neat, and maybe a necessary, prop for your Holmesian whodunit. So, misgivings aside, hooray to you for bringing back the great Sherlock and his faithful sidekick Watson. And, not incidentally, for taking me back to those exciting, youthful Saturday afternoons in the movie house watching Messrs Rathbone and Bruce, Hollywood’s best Holmes and Watson, at work. For this old geezer, that was an anti-aging pill, for sure. Keep up the splendid work.”

Sherlock Holmes and The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter is available from all good bookstores including   Amazon USAAmazon UKWaterstones UK, and for free shipping worldwide Book Depository . In ebook format it is in Kobo and Apple iBooks (iPad/iPhone).

TIME Magazine - Einstein CCover

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